Make George Washington Work For You

If you work, you most likely get a tax return. If not, I feel sorry for you, now go stand in the corner and feel shunned.

Kidding.

Anyway, what I’m doing this year with my tax return is this: Making it work for me. I worked my ass off for that tax return, and now I’m going to give it the same treatment it gave me. Hard work, and a bit of flogging.

I’ve taken $1,000 of my return and sent it up to my stock portfolio. That’s about 10 times the amount I invest on a normal basis, but that’s the point. Investing is long term. Which means, if you’re doing it a little at a time, even fucking longer. I love it though. I love to watch the little numbers go from little numbers to big numbers, growing up and spitting out little numbers of their own.

Yes…I did just refer to my dividend paying stocks like they were children. And that’s how I treat them. I watch over them, I make sure they’re growing and doing the things they should, and I guide them as needed, but for the most part I let them do what they do, and live their own lives.

You can expect that this month’s portfolio evaluation will be greatly in the negatives, but don’t let that fool you. Negatives are fine. Negatives below cost-basis are not. And that’s the idea.

What’s cost-basis you ask, oh digital reader who I can apparently hear?

Cost basis is the price that you paid for those stocks. Meaning, if you dropped $1,000 on stocks, your cost basis is $1,000. Now, if you’re smart like me (which you are, because you’re here) you know that you need to also figure in commission. So, for this $1,000 investment I’m losing $4 per trade, on 4 trades that totals $16. But the total amount I’m spending is $1,000 for that cost-basis, meaning only $986 of it is going towards actual shares of stock.

So if you decide to go ahead and use the Capitalist Cares Stock Portfolio as your way of tracking stocks, you’ll need to know a few things. When you look at cell B3, you’ll see it’s labeled Portfolio Profit. You might believe that’s simple cost basis with current value subtracted. That is not the case. That is all expenses subtracted from Current Portfolio Value. By all expenses, I mean I include future expenses into it. The value there is the dollar amount that I would have as profit if I were to sell every share that I owned at the current prices without any change. It sounds hard to calculate, but really all I did was add the sell commission to the cost basis. I did that by subtracting that from the value for each row. You can see that figured in on the F row. The part of the formula that reads “- $E$2” is the defining calculation for removing the sale commission.

This post has gotten a bit long and boring. So here is a picture of a cow. Because, you know…cow.

Moo, bitches...

Moo, bitches…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s